Caine’s Arcade – a boy and a dream go viral


Imagination. Innovation. Incredible power of social media.

A 9-year-old boy in Los Angeles with a big dream and tons of creativity spends his summer building an arcade out of leftover cardboard, hoping customers to his dad’s auto parts shop will stop and play.

But in this day of online shopping, his dad’s customers shop by mouse click, not by foot.

No one stops to play.

Until one day, a customer shopping for a car door handle stops to play, buys the fun pass, and becomes enamored with the boy’s imagination, innovation, and incredible execution.

That customer, Nirvan Mullick, dreams another big dream, and the rest of the story is how videos go viral.

Watch.

Postscript: More than $100,000 has been donated to a trust fund for Caine’s college education. Imagine the technological wizardry to come from this boy’s imagination.

Draw me a picture (at SXSW)


Not able to attend SXSW (the South by SouthWest conference), I have to live vicariously through the tweets, blog posts, slideshares, and other conference notes from attendees who happen to be among my social media contacts.

So, this set of hand-drawn notes by ad agency Ogilvy appeals to me on several angles.

First, it’s visual. Colorful. Image-based, more than text-based content.

Second, it’s good for business. Clever that this agency differentiated itself from others, the illustrations open potential business opportunities for Ogilvy, simply because presenters and followers who request a free 11×17″ print might linger, browse, and perhaps do business with Ogilvy.

Third, it’s cleverly different. Unlike the presentations posted on other sites, notes posted on blogs, and photos and tweets, this visualization of the content got my attention.

Prepare to be visually fascinated!
See http://ogilvynotes.com/

Twitter Mozaic


I updated my Twitter Mozaic, which I first blogged about in July 2009:

Get your twitter mosaic here.

Touchscreen or keyboard?


As designers add tactile touchscreen interfaces to devices, some debate the ease of use.

Some users suffer from limited tactile sense control. Others struggle with the smaller size of the visual keys. Still others need the audible and tactile feedback from hardware keys.

Would these hacks solve those user interface problems?

Discovered at socialjunjun.typepad.com/.

PowerPoint Comedy of Errors


UPDATE 2010: Don McMillan updated his comedy bit for 2010! (first posted in 2007…)

How many errors can you find in this PowerPoint show? Making the rounds on video sites is Don McMillan’s clever presentation, Life after Death by Powerpoint.
Did you spot the

Continue reading

How to say “I am sorry” to a designer


sorry.jpgI found this in my Stumbleupon wanderings:

swiss-miss.com/2010/02/im-sorry.html

Clever. Inside joke? Not if you use Windows shortcuts. Your designer will appreciate it.

Oh, it’s Command+Z to the designer, most likely a Mac user.

The art of the focal point


“Every good design needs a focal point.” Garr Reynolds begins in this meaty blog post.

Explaining “Tokonoma,” Garr moves from the Japanese architectural and cultural explanation, into the realm of practical application in—of all things—presentations. He takes the real-life, explains the concepts, and turns them back into the real life.

Brilliantly depicting before and after examples of presentation images, Garr shows examples that my most-practical and literal-minded followers can swallow.

I encourge you to apply the principles if you do any of the following:

  • create presentations and training visuals
  • design living spaces or workspaces
  • create visual communications (even the most-basic e-mail!)
  • Read his post on presentationzen.com.